Word Power Chapter 1

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Menu
= French detailed list (< Latin minutus = small)
Cuisine Cuisine
= French kitchen; cookery
Meat
< Old English mete
Beef
< Old French boef (< Latin bos, bovis = cow). Cf. Modern French boeuf
Chicken
< Germanic chiken
Poultry
< Middle French poulet (Latin pullus = young of any animal). Cf. Spanish and Italian pollo
Appetite
< Latin verb appeto = seek, desire
Palate
< Latin palatum = roof of the mouth
Salmon
< Latin salmon, salmonis = salmon
Rice
< Old French ris (< Italian riso < Greek oryzon)
Rice
< Old French ris (< Italian riso < Greek oryzon)
Carrot
< French carotte (< Latin carota < Greek karoton)
Bread
< Old English bread. Cf. German brot
BUT Latin panis > French pain, Italian pane, Spanish pan
Wine
< Latin vinum (cf. French vin, and Italian and Spanish vino)
Whiskey
< Gaelic usqebaugh (“the water of life”)
Vodka
< Russian voda (water)
Pasta
< Latin pasta (dough) (< Greek pastos = sprinkled). Originally, pasta was a kind of porridge sprinkled with salt.
Linguini
< Latin lingua (tongue)
Spaghetti
< Italian spago (cord, rope)
Cheese
< Latin caseus
Curry
< Tamil kari (sauce)
Restaurant
< Latin restauro (restore)
Pizza
< Italian pizza < derivation unclear but perhaps from Latin placenta (cake)
Salad
< French salade < Latin salata (salted)
Vegetable
< Latin vegeo (grow)
Squash
< Narragansett Native American askutasquash (“thing eaten green”)
Tomato
< Spanish tomate (< Aztec tomatl)
Potato
< Spanish patata (Taino < batata)
Avocado
< Spanish aguacate (
Spinach
< Old Spanish espinaca (< Arabic isfanakh)
Onion
< Latin unio (pearl)
Lettuce
< Latin lactuca
Pea
< Latin pisum (cf. Italian pisello, Fench pois)
Radish
< Old English raedic (Latin < radix = root)
Dessert
< French desservir (to clear the table)
Fruit
< Latin fruor = enjoy
Apricot
< the original form of the word in English was apricock, from the Portuguese albricoque, which, in turn, came from the Arabic al-birquq. The Arabic word, however, was a transliteration of a Latin adjective, Praecoquum (early ripening), a term that could be applied to any fruit.
Apple
< Old English aeppel Cf. German apfel
Pie
< Middle English pie (shallow pit) < Old French puis < Latin puleus (well)
Chocolate
< Nahuatl chocolatl
Cake
< Middle English kake. Cf. Icelandic kaka, German kuchen, Dutch coek. Cookie is a diminutive form of coek.
Pretzel
< German bretzel (< Latin bracellus = bracelet)
Coffee
< Turkish kahve (< Arabic qahwah). Cf. French cafe (coffee shop), and cafeteria.
Tea
< Chinese t’e (Amoy dialect); the more common Chinese word is the Mandarin ch’a.

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