classics 50 final

Posted by
model of a shrine, from argos. later 8th century bc, terracotta – athens – dark age/geometric greece
[image]
plan and reconstruction of an oval house, smyrna, 10th century bc – dark age/geometric greece
[image]
reconstruction drawing of the heroon at lafkandi, 10th century bc – dark age/geometric greece
[image]
reconstruction drawing of early temple at Eretria – 800-750 bc – dark age/geometric greece – geometric
[image]
conjectured plan of the first temple of hera, samos – prob 8th century bc altar 8th century bc – dark age/geometric greece
[image]
protogeometric pots from the kerameikos cemetery, Athens. Late 11/10th century bc – dark age/geometric greece
[image]
geometric vases from the burial 9th century bc – dark age/geometric greece
[image]
late geometric krater, from thebes – 730 bc – dark age/geometric greece
[image]
greek colonization in southern italy and sicily – dark age/geometric greece
[image]
protocorinthian olpe – the chigi vase – 650 bc – arhcaic age – orientalizing period
[image]
early corinthian animal style amphora – 625-600 bc – arhcaic age – orientalizing period
[image]
protocratic amphora – the eleusis amphora 650 bc – arhcaic age – orientalizing period
[image]
late protoacttic/early black-figure amphora, the nessos amphora 625-600 bc – arhcaic age – orientalizing period
[image]
plan of the temple of apollo, thermon 625 bc arhcaic age – orientalizing period
[image]
reconstruction of the columns, capitals, and bases of the Temple of Athena. Smyrna 600 bc – arhcaic age – orientalizing period
[image]
torso of a female “daedalic” figurine 650-625 bc – terracotta -arhcaic age – orientalizing period
[image]
over-lifesize daedalic marble core from seliada, thera 640 bc – arhcaic age – orientalizing period
[image]
restored elevation and plan of the temple of artemis, corcyra – 580 bc – archaic greece
[image]
meletope from the so-called treasury of the sikyonians, delphi: the cattle raid of the dioskouroi, 560 bc, lime stone – archaic greece
[image]
treasury of the siphnians, delphi, east pedimen, 530 bc, marble – archaic greece
[image]
meletope from the treasury of the athenians, delphi: herakles and teh hind, 490-480 bc – archaic greece
[image]
metope from temple C, Selinus: Herakles and Kerkopes 540 bc limestoins – archaic greece 6.31 or 6.32 look in book
[image]
metope from temple Y, Selinus: Europa and the Bull 560-550 bc, limestone – archaic greece – 6.31 or 6.32
[image]
plan of the agora, athens 500 bc – archaic greece
[image]
new york kouros, said to be from actica 600 bc, marble – archaic greece
[image]
mentuemhet, egyptian prince, early 6th century – archaic greece
[image]
twin jouroi, from delphi, 580 bc – archaic greece
[image]
diagram of garments – archaic greece
[image]
attic bilingual (black figure and red-figure) amphora from Andokidles’ workshop: Herakles driving a bull
[image]
above attic red-figure amphora attributed to the Berlin painter: a reveler 490-480 bc
[image]
plan of the sanctuary of zeus at olympia – period of transition
[image]
temple of zeus, olympia section showing cult statue of zeus – later 5th century – period of transition
[image]
plan of poseidonia, italy, showing the outline of the city wall, the regulated street plan, the urban sanctuaries of athena and hera, the agora, the suburban sanctuary of aphrodite at santa venera (and the side of the later roman forum) 450 bc – period of transition
[image]
perspective reconstruction of the painted stoa 475-450 bc – period of transition
[image]
plan of the agora, athens – athenia agora, 400 bc – period of transition
[image]
the kritios boy, kouros attributed to the sculptur kritios 475 bc – period of transition
[image]
riace warrior a, 460-450 bc, bronze w copper lips and nipples, silver teeth, and eyes inlaid – period of transition
[image]
race warrior b, 460-450 bc, bronze w copper lips and nipples, and eyes inlaid (one preserved) – period of transition
[image]
funerary stele relief, 470 bc, athena mourning dead soilders – period of transition
[image]
drawing of a restoration of the acropolis, athens
[image]
parthenon, athens, view from the northwest, 447-432 bc, marble – classical
[image]
parthenon, athens, west frieze in situ, from below: cavalcade in preparation, 447-438 bc – classical
[image]
roman copy, phidias’s athena parthenos, 2nd century copy of 438 original – classic
[image]
propylaia to the acropolis, athens, from the east, view of inner facade 437-432 bc – classical
[image]
temple of athena nike, athens, view from east showing tetrastyle columns of the facade and monolithic columns 420s bc, marble – classical
[image]
erechtheion, athens, north porch from the east 430s-406 bc, marble w black eleusinian limestone for frieze blocks to which marble figures were attached – classical
[image]
caryatid from the south porch of the erechtheion, acropolis of athens 420-410 bc, marble – classical
[image]
hephaisteion, athens from the southwest (carved metopes visible at extreme east) 450-415 bc – classical
[image]
plan of athens, later 5th century bc – classical
[image]
temple of artemis, ephesos, reconstruction of the 4th century bc – the fourth century
[image]
theater, epidauros, early 3rd century bc
[image]
priene, model of the hillside town showing grid and zoning for agora (center), theater, sanctuaries, council chamber, and other public uses, 4th century bc and later
[image]
Meleager, probably by skopas. roman marble copy of 340 bc greek original
[image]
apoxyomenos (man scraping himself) roman copy of a 350-325 bc bronze greek original by lysippos, marble
[image]
alexander mosaic: culminating moment in battle of issos between greeks and persians: confrontation between alexander and darius, floor mosaic from pompeii, adaption of wall painting from 310 bc by philoxenos of eretia 1st century bc
[image]
old market woman, late 2nd or early 1st century bc copy of a 3rd century original
[image]
the great altar, pergamon, north wing, 175-150 bc marble – helenistic period
[image]
the laocoon group: laocoon and his sons battling the serpents (earlier restoration) … 2nd century bc or first century ad
[image]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *